Injera Recipe

A naturally fermented, spongy, gluten-free flatbread from Ethiopia is made from teff flour and Water, using wild yeast to ferment over a couple of days. It is then cooked like a crepe and turned into a flavorful, tangy bread to serve with your favorite Ethiopian food. The fermentation process can take up to 2 or 3 days, depending on your climate.

There are a number of different recipes to make Injera and none have a solid formula. A number of factors can alter the quality of injera such as the temperature of the grill, the type of grill (Mitad), the temperature of the dough during fermentation, quality of the flour, ways of mixing the dough, etc.

Injera is typically served with vegetables and/or meat on top where the bread is actually an eating utensil.

MEASUREMENTS AND INGREDIENTS

  • 5 pounds self-rising flour
  • 1 pound teff
  • 1 pound corn flour
  • 1/2 gallon Water (till medium thickness)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Add all ingredients in large bowl and mix thoroughly by hand.
  2. Let it ferment overnight (24 hours) in room temperature.
  3. Heat a flat round or square grill (Mitad) to 400 degrees.
  4. Remix the dough; if too thick add more Water till dough is runny (medium thickness).
  5. Pour dough on grill in rotating motion. Let cook approx. 30 sec – 1 min. and remove by grabbing one end with both hands.
  6. Let cool to room temperature before serving. If you see the eyes and it feels spongy, then you have your perfect Ethiopian bread

RECIPE SOURCE: https://allaboutethio.com/rinjera.html

 


Alternative Recipe

Injera 2 | Ethiopian Food Guide
IMAGE SOURCE

MEASUREMENTS AND INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups cake flour
  • 1 cup buckwheat flour
  • 2 tablespoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups club soda
  • 1 cup white or rice vinegar
  • Oil

INSTRUCTIONS

To make the Injera is just as simple. These are the basic steps:

  1. Mix both types of flour, salt and baking soda together in a large bowl.
  2. Whisk in the club soda until the mixture is smooth.
  3. Then add the vinegar and mix a bit more. You will note that a type of batter is formed.

It is now time to cook your pancake-like pieces of flatbread. These are the basic steps:

  1. Wipe a skillet with the oil.
  2. Heat the skillet over a medium heat.
  3. Scoop the batter into the skillet and create a circle while carefully swirling the pan to help form the round pancake-like pieces of bread.
  4. Cook for one minute and flip the cooking batter as you would a pancake.
  5. Repeat until all the batter is used.
  6. Remember, Injera must be slightly crispy, as it will soften on standing.
  7. Cut the Injera in half with a pizza cutter, roll into tubes and stack on top of each other.
  8. Serve with your Doro Wot.

RECIPE SOURCE: https://www.demandafrica.com/food/all-you-need-to-know-about-ethiopian-food/

 


Alternative Recipe

Injera 3 | Ethiopian Food Guide
IMAGE SOURCE

MEASUREMENTS AND INGREDIENTS

  • ½ cup white teff flour
  • ¼ cup brown teff flour
  • 3 tablespoons white teff flour, divided, or as needed
  • 1 cup Water
  • 3 tablespoons Water, divided, or as needed
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Mix 1/2 cup white teff flour and brown teff flour together in a bowl. Add 1 cup Water and whisk well. Pour mixture into a glass container large enough to hold 3 times the original volume. Cover with cheesecloth or other breathable fabric to keep out dust; do not seal with plastic wrap as air circulation is vital. Leave covered container in a draft-free environment; the mixture needs air to be circulated in order to ferment. Stir batter 2 times over 24 hours.
  2. Check for bubbles and possibly an increase in volume after 24 hours; there may also be a slightly tangy and sour smell. When you notice these things, add 1 tablespoon white teff flour and 1 tablespoon Water to the batter and whisk well. Check in a few hours to see if bubbles have again formed, mixture has increased in volume, and the pungent smell is still evident; if so, the batter is ready and you can skip to the cooking process (step 5).
  3. Leave batter to rest another 12 hours if the mixture has not begun to form or smell sour after the first 24 hours; stir once during this time. Check to see if bubbles have formed, mixture has increased in volume, and a pungent smell is evident; if so, proceed with step 4.
  4. Mix together 2 tablespoons white teff flour and 2 tablespoons Water in a bowl, making sure there are no lumps. Add mixture to the batter, whisking well. Wait a few hours; batter should be bubbly with a noticeable increase in volume and a pungent but fragrant smell, indicating it is ready to be cooked.
  5. Heat an 8-inch crepe pan or nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add oil. Pour a scant 1/2 cup batter slowly and steadily into the hot pan in a circular motion from outside to inside. Cover the pan completely in a spiral without swirling. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, allowing steam to cook the top of the bread, 1 to 3 minutes. Remove from pan with spatula and transfer to a plate; cover to keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter.

NOTE:

The objective of the fermentation process is to achieve a liquid mixture (like a crepe batter) with a slightly pungent smell and a moderate increase in volume. This can take up to 3 days but could occur in 12 hours, depending on the humidity and temperature of the environment. Keep your eye and nose on the mixture to understand when it is ready.

Learn More About Ethiopian Foods Here.

RECIPE SOURCE: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/264651/injera-ethiopian-teff-bread/?internalSource=hub%20recipe&referringContentType=Search

IMAGE SOURCE: https://craftlog.com/us/cooking/ext-quick-injera-recipe-ethiopian-sourdough-crepe-yXVC